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  • Petra Coveney

Magnesium & the Menopause

Updated: Sep 8, 2019

Are you missing this magic mineral?


If you're menopausal and struggling to sleep at night, or feel chronic fatigue, have muscle cramps, low mood, eye twitching, try taking Magnesium - the magic mineral.

Magnesium is one of the most important minerals in the body and is required for hundreds of enzymes to work properly. It can be particularly effective during the menopause by supporting both both heart and bone health. It can also help with menopausal insomnia and other symptoms such as low mood.


Yet, surprisingly, adult women do not get enough magnesium from their diet: we need approx 300mg a day (see food sources below).

It lowers the risk of heart attack and stroke

The risk of heart disease for women increases after the menopause. Low magnesium levels are associated with artery health issues and may cause spasms, calcification and unwanted blood clots, which are more pronounced with stress. A large study involving more than 300,000 people, found that people with an in magnesium in their blood levels were 30% lower risk of heart attack or stroke. This same study also found that an increase in magnesium from food by 200mg per day reduced the risk of heart disease by 22 per cent.


It keeps bones strong

During the menopause women can lose up to 10 per cent of bone density. Magnesium is needed to regulate the flow of calcium in and out of bones, which is important for the prevention of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. Women with osteoporosis have significantly lower levels of magnesium than those without the condition, and those with the lowest intakes were at greater risk of hip fractures.


It can combat menopausal insomnia and low mood

As many women have experienced, the menopause can impact on sleep patterns. Studies have shown that people who have difficulty sleeping generally often have lower levels of magnesium and that increasing their intake by way of supplements can not only help them to nod off but improve the quality of their sleep. Magnesium is also known as ‘nature’s tranquilliser’, and has been shown to help with other menopausal.


How do you know if you are deficient in Magnesium?

Some of the symptoms of your magnesium deficiency include:

Loss of appetite; Nausea; Vomiting; Fatigue; Weakness Abnormal Numbness or tingling Muscle contractions and cramps.

When our magnesium levels are low, we can start craving stimulants such as coffee to boost our energy, or chocolate which is a natural source of magnesium


Where can I find Magnesium?

You can either buy mineral supplements or eat magnesium rich foods.


Foods which contain magnesium:

Green leafy vegetables (e.g. spinach and kale)

Fruit (figs, avocado, banana and raspberries)

Nuts and seeds

Legumes (black beans, chickpeas and kidney beans)

Vegetables (peas, broccoli, cabbage, green beans, artichokes, asparagus, brussel sprouts)

Seafood (oily fish like salmon, mackerel, tuna)

Whole grains (brown rice and oats)

Tofu

Baked beans

Chlorella powder.

Raw caca-

Dark Chocolate.


The bad news is you need to avoid sugar, alcohol and caffeine - but the good news is, you can eat dark chocolate!


Stock your kitchen cabinets with these foods asap and enjoy their ingredients; you don't need to be magnesium deficient to enjoy delicious menopause dishes


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